What really happened to humpty online dating

18-Jun-2017 10:40

To further tantalize literary types, at the end of the song listeners hear a scene from King Lear in the background, with Oswald’s final words, “O, untimely death! (That line ended up as grist for the “Paul is dead” conspiracy mill, of course.) As it turns out, the performance of Lear just happened to be on a radio that was tuned to the BBC while they were mixing the song.

The studio engineer Geoff Emerick said it was Lennon’s idea to get some “random radio noise” from “twiddling the dial,” an injection of John Cage–style found audio.

” —Alice, upon first reading “Jabberwocky” in Through the Looking-Glass Inspired nonsense has held me in its spell for as long as I can remember.

The bit about flying like Lucy in the sky linked back to “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” obviously enough. Of course the walrus was John, and wait a minute, wasn’t there a walrus in Through the Looking-Glass?It was over in the record cabinet, on the raucously colorful Magical Mystery Tour LP: “I Am the Walrus,” the final track of side one. And then Lennon, continuing the two-note wobble with his thin voice, delivers that recital of deceptively simple words, with “I,” “you,” “he,” “me,” and “we” all coming together. At least it was easier to grab onto, at age 7 or 8, than mouthfuls like crabalocker fishwife or semolina pilchard.A musical childhood memory: The turntable on our Heathkit stereo spins, and I hear Lennon’s electric piano wobbling between two notes. The LP had lyrics for some of the songs in the gatefold, and I began studying them as the record played.The image of a “Quarry Bank literature master pontificating about the symbolism of Lennon-Mc Cartney” inspired him to come up with “yellow matter custard” and similarly cockeyed lines.As Shotton tells it, after Lennon wrote down the line about “semolina pilchard” unaccountably scaling the Eiffel Tower, he smiled and said, “Let the fuckers work that one out, Pete! Maybe the song is just a put-on, or a kind of a dare. It is endlessly analyzable, and yet somehow analysis-proof.

The bit about flying like Lucy in the sky linked back to “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” obviously enough. Of course the walrus was John, and wait a minute, wasn’t there a walrus in Through the Looking-Glass?

It was over in the record cabinet, on the raucously colorful Magical Mystery Tour LP: “I Am the Walrus,” the final track of side one. And then Lennon, continuing the two-note wobble with his thin voice, delivers that recital of deceptively simple words, with “I,” “you,” “he,” “me,” and “we” all coming together. At least it was easier to grab onto, at age 7 or 8, than mouthfuls like crabalocker fishwife or semolina pilchard.

A musical childhood memory: The turntable on our Heathkit stereo spins, and I hear Lennon’s electric piano wobbling between two notes. The LP had lyrics for some of the songs in the gatefold, and I began studying them as the record played.

The image of a “Quarry Bank literature master pontificating about the symbolism of Lennon-Mc Cartney” inspired him to come up with “yellow matter custard” and similarly cockeyed lines.

As Shotton tells it, after Lennon wrote down the line about “semolina pilchard” unaccountably scaling the Eiffel Tower, he smiled and said, “Let the fuckers work that one out, Pete! Maybe the song is just a put-on, or a kind of a dare. It is endlessly analyzable, and yet somehow analysis-proof.

It was based on a British playground rhyme that went, Yellow matter custard, green slop pie, all mixed together with a dead dog’s eye.