Noticiero de venezuela online dating

30-Dec-2017 03:41

Although official government data shows that internet penetration was over 60 percent by the end of 2014, connection speeds are still very low, with an average connection speed of around 1.4 Mbps.[5] Even as the government tightens its grip on the media by neutralizing media outlets, launching progovernment outlets, and restricting access to foreign currency needed to import newsprint, citizens have continued to create vibrant communities and discussions through digital media and social networks.[6] The past year marked the creation of new digital ventures, which will add diverse voices to the digital landscape.

[7] Meanwhile, a number of new cell phone applications and Twitter feeds have adapted to help Venezuelans, some of the region’s most active social media users, battle continuous shortages in the midst of the economic crisis.[8] Internet penetration in Venezuela remains extremely uneven, with a significant divide between rural and urban areas.

In the wake of active protests on social media, the government has announced the possible enactment of new laws to limit digital activism and access to information online.[4] Less overt limitations on online freedom stem from financial restrictions that limit investments in telecommunications infrastructure.

Poor access and low quality connections continue to plague the country.

As the crisis engulfing Venezuela’s economy has deepened in the past few years, dollars have become scarce and people have flocked to the black market in droves to access foreign currency.[62] The government has waged a war on the site Dólar Today (Dollar Today), a prominent site run out of Florida which publishes the black market exchange rate,[63] blocking hundreds of URLs in its effort to purge links and re-blogged content from the site.

In March 2015, CONATEL tried to block the mobile app of the Dollar Today platform, and in the process, ended up blocking all of Amazon’s cloud (S3 service) where the app was hosted.

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The government regulatory body CONATEL blocked over 1,000 webpages between November 2013 and October 2014 by way of sending a blacklist of sites to CANTV and private ISPs.[59] A report by the journalist William Peña also suggests that the state provider CANTV may have independently decided to block certain sites without necessarily receiving instruction to do so from CONATEL.[60] Pages publishing the black market dollar exchange rates constituted the vast majority of the blocked sites.[61] Over the past decade the government has instituted a complex series of currency and price controls, granting the state control of almost all foreign exchange.

The quality of internet access is also low, a problem exacerbated by the restricted access to foreign currency, which has led to deterioration of telecommunication infrastructure.

Blackouts of electricity are common, especially in smaller, rural cities where they frequently last many hours and sometimes even days.

Although this plan has introduced Wi-Fi in some areas, it has not met demand.[22] Meanwhile, the National Transportation Network, an ambitious plan by CANTV to set up about 20,000 kilometers of fiber-optic cable is progressing very slowly.[23] The government claims that the Simón Bolívar satellite has provided internet and mobile connectivity in even the remote reaches of the country, but independent sources could not yet verify these claims.[24] The quality of internet connections for the majority of the population remains low and has been exacerbated by deterioration in telecommunications infrastructure due to limits imposed on foreign currency.[25] According to CONATEL, investment and earnings among private network providers have gone up when measured in the national currency VEF. According to the Akamai Report, Venezuela, which has some of the slowest internet in the region was one of only two countries that saw a decline in average connection speeds between 20.[29] The average internet connection on fixed broadband is around 1.4 Mbps.[30] Faster internet connections are concentrated in the capital city and in wealthy areas.

For example, a new Wi Max provider and a small company that offer speeds up to 25 Mbps market their services in wealthy regions of the country’s capital.[31] Among this small minority are elite with access to superior connections; some small initiatives of IPTV have also opened and gained users.[32] With average speeds over 4 Mbps, mobile connection speeds tend to be much faster than fixed-internet connections in Venezuela,[33] and the country is increasingly seeing people turn to mobile connections to access the internet.

The government regulatory body CONATEL blocked over 1,000 webpages between November 2013 and October 2014 by way of sending a blacklist of sites to CANTV and private ISPs.[59] A report by the journalist William Peña also suggests that the state provider CANTV may have independently decided to block certain sites without necessarily receiving instruction to do so from CONATEL.[60] Pages publishing the black market dollar exchange rates constituted the vast majority of the blocked sites.[61] Over the past decade the government has instituted a complex series of currency and price controls, granting the state control of almost all foreign exchange.

The quality of internet access is also low, a problem exacerbated by the restricted access to foreign currency, which has led to deterioration of telecommunication infrastructure.

Blackouts of electricity are common, especially in smaller, rural cities where they frequently last many hours and sometimes even days.

Although this plan has introduced Wi-Fi in some areas, it has not met demand.[22] Meanwhile, the National Transportation Network, an ambitious plan by CANTV to set up about 20,000 kilometers of fiber-optic cable is progressing very slowly.[23] The government claims that the Simón Bolívar satellite has provided internet and mobile connectivity in even the remote reaches of the country, but independent sources could not yet verify these claims.[24] The quality of internet connections for the majority of the population remains low and has been exacerbated by deterioration in telecommunications infrastructure due to limits imposed on foreign currency.[25] According to CONATEL, investment and earnings among private network providers have gone up when measured in the national currency VEF. According to the Akamai Report, Venezuela, which has some of the slowest internet in the region was one of only two countries that saw a decline in average connection speeds between 20.[29] The average internet connection on fixed broadband is around 1.4 Mbps.[30] Faster internet connections are concentrated in the capital city and in wealthy areas.

For example, a new Wi Max provider and a small company that offer speeds up to 25 Mbps market their services in wealthy regions of the country’s capital.[31] Among this small minority are elite with access to superior connections; some small initiatives of IPTV have also opened and gained users.[32] With average speeds over 4 Mbps, mobile connection speeds tend to be much faster than fixed-internet connections in Venezuela,[33] and the country is increasingly seeing people turn to mobile connections to access the internet.

In the midst of a worsening economic crisis,[1] declining popularity for President Nicolás Maduro, and upcoming parliamentary elections,[2] the government has increased efforts to maintain control of the media.