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30-Jul-2017 22:44

During the nineteenth century, as midday dinner moved later and later into the day, the need for hot supper declined, only to be replaced with light dishes made of cold leftovers, ingredients for which the sandwich proved preeminently suitable.Thus the sandwich became a fixture of intimate evening suppers, teas, and picnics, and popular fare for taverns and inns.From the buttered bread and thick slice which was used in the Tudor period as the foundation of meat dishes there is a direct line of descent to the sandwich.But according to all the rules of sciences governing nutrition the sandwich should never have been born.Katz, editor, William Woys Weaver, assoicate editor [Charles Scribner's Sons: New York] 2003, Volume 3 (p.235-6) [NOTE: This book has far more information than can be paraphrased here.That respectable body...affording every evening a sight truly English.

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During the early years of the railroad, sandwiches proved an ideal form of fast food, especially since they could be sold at train stations when everyone got off to buy snacks...

Ask your librarian to help you find a copy.] "The invention of the sandwich and its acceptance as an institution is a typical example of the power of the ways of life to prevail over all so-called rules of gastronomy and even established facts of physiology and psychology.

Bread, when cut into slices, has always proved a handy foundation for other food.

This is not so easy and often the eater does not try to guess at all but is satisfied with something esay to chew and swallow which satisfies his hunger.

The sandwich is thus a poor substitute for a single slice of bread, spread with something won can both see and anticipate in advance.

During the early years of the railroad, sandwiches proved an ideal form of fast food, especially since they could be sold at train stations when everyone got off to buy snacks...Ask your librarian to help you find a copy.] "The invention of the sandwich and its acceptance as an institution is a typical example of the power of the ways of life to prevail over all so-called rules of gastronomy and even established facts of physiology and psychology.Bread, when cut into slices, has always proved a handy foundation for other food.This is not so easy and often the eater does not try to guess at all but is satisfied with something esay to chew and swallow which satisfies his hunger.The sandwich is thus a poor substitute for a single slice of bread, spread with something won can both see and anticipate in advance.In many countries we find sandwiches set down on plates in the home for lunch or tea, and also at snack-bars..sandwich tastes much the same as another, unless the filling has a very pronounced flavour... This account of the origin of the word is given by Grosley [in a publication titled] Londres (1770).